Design

Government to examine sale of computer chip design firm Arm to US company Nvidia

The Government is examining the sale of UK-based computer chip design firm Arm to US tech giant Nvidia, with Boris Johnson taking a personal interest in the deal, his spokesman said.

Earlier on Monday, it was announced that the firm is to be bought by the US graphics chip maker in a deal worth 40 billion dollars (£31.2 billion).

Nvidia has pledged to keep Arm’s headquarters in Cambridge while also promising to expand on Arm’s work to build a “world-class” technology centre.

Arm is best known as the designer of processor chips used in most major smartphones – including Apple and Samsung – as well as other devices such as laptops.

Now the Government has confirmed it will examine the deal closely in order to understand its impact on the UK and the economy.

“We recognise the vital role Arm plays in the UK’s tech sector and its significant contribution

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Men’s Journal Style & Design 2020: Best New Innovative Gear

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Specialized Turbo Vado SL e-bike
Specialized Turbo Vado SL e-bike Courtesy Image

The Stealth Commuter

It took a small army of designers and engineers to build Specialized’s 33-pound, long-range Turbo Vado SL e-bike. A 320 Wh battery, plus a lightweight motor and fittings, created a ride you can actually lift, which still assists up to 28 mph. “You don’t need a big engine to get to top speed,” says Senior Product Manager Marco Sonderegger. “And, just because you have a big gas tank doesn’t mean you have big range. If the original 50-pound Turbo Vado was an F350, this one is a Prius.”

If the original 50-pound Turbo Vado was an F350, this one is a Prius.

The battery is hidden in the frame, and the bike’s so light you forget it’s electric—until you need a boost. The sleek setup comes with lights and a computer mount, as well as

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Otto Aviation Hopes To Torpedo The Business Jet Market With Its Curious New Design. Will It Sink Or Swim?

Otto Aviation is looking for investors to advance its unconventional “Celera” business aircraft from a prototype to a production airplane built in the thousands. The media attention the company has garnered since formally unveiling the Celera 500L last week is no doubt pleasing.

But with the spotlight comes scrutiny and the questions that all startup aviation manufacturers face. The answers often determine whether a new effort even reaches the market. In Otto’s case the mere appearance of the Celera with its bulbous fuselage, pusher propeller and short, thin wing, leads to questions.

The man responsible for the project, and the Celera’s distinctive shape, is William Otto Sr., a former researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory, chief scientist at North American Aviation (subsumed by Boeing in the 1990s after a series of mergers) and founder of aviation

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