technology

Internet Giants Could Be Fined up to $12 Million Under Austrian Hate Speech Law | Technology News

VIENNA (Reuters) – Austria plans to oblige large internet platforms like Facebook and Google to delete illegal content within days and impose fines of up to 10 million euros ($12 million) in case of non-compliance, the government said on Thursday.

Austria’s online hate speech law, now being drawn up, will target platforms with more than 100,000 users and annual revenues of more than 500,000 euros, Justice Minister Alma Zadic said. It will give victims of online insults and abuse the opportunity to fight back quickly at a low cost, she said.

“The internet is not a lawless space. Our rule of law also applies to the internet,” the minister told a news conference. A new fast-track procedure, free of charge for the first three years, would enable victims to obtain a cease and desist order within days.

Platforms will be obliged to set up easily accessible reporting systems, appoint a

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Let’s Get the Nature of Mauritius Back with Japanese Technology

TOKYO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Aug 31, 2020–

On July 25, 2020, the Japanese bulk carrier ship WAKASHIO, owned by a subsidiary of Nagashiki Shipping Co., Ltd. of Okayama, Japan, became stranded off the coast of Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean, and about 1,000 tons of heavy oil spilled into the beautiful ocean.

If we do nothing, native sea turtles, classified as an endangered species, would disappear from this world. There are waterfowl habitats of wetlands and mangrove forests designated as wetlands of international importance under the Ramsar Convention, so the ecosystem of these birds could be destroyed. It is said that the coral reefs around Mauritius contain over 40% of the world’s 800 species of hard coral. According to some experts, adhesion of heavy oil makes coral unable to breath, eventually resulting in its death.

If we do not immediately remove the heavy oil spilled from the freighter, the natural environment of Mauritius

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Surface clean-up technology won’t solve ocean plastic problem

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IMAGE: Plastic bag in the ocean
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Credit: Making Oceans Plastic Free

Clean-up devices that collect waste from the ocean surface won’t solve the plastic pollution problem, a new study shows.

Researchers compared estimates of current and future plastic waste with the ability of floating clean-up devices to collect it – and found the impact of such devices was “very modest”.
However, river barriers could be more effective and – though they have no impact on plastic already in the oceans – they could reduce pollution “significantly” if used in tandem with surface clean-up technology.

The study – by the University of Exeter, the Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research, the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Jacobs University and Making Oceans Plastic Free – focusses on floating plastic, as sunk waste is difficult or impossible to remove depending on size and location.

The authors estimate that

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The Marine Technology Society announces its 2020 award recipients

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IMAGE: The Marine Technology Society has announced its 2020 Award Winners. The diverse field of individual recipients have distinguished themselves in their work, through technological accomplishment, volunteer service, or mentorship. In…
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Credit: MTS

WASHINGTON, DC– The Marine Technology Society has announced its 2020 Award Winners. The diverse field of individual recipients–students, young professionals, and career professionals–have distinguished themselves in their work, through technological accomplishment, volunteer service, or mentorship. In addition, MTS is honoring a company for its outstanding contribution for the advancement in a marine technology and our MTS Committees and Sections who are foundational to the advancement of the MTS mission. Our awardees work with unfailing commitment to tackle problems that impact our globally connected society in real and tangible ways that many people aren’t fully aware of. The awards will be presented on October 8, 2020 at the virtual Global OCEANS 2020: Singapore – U.S. Gulf

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Boeing boosts 737 Max safety with spacecraft and drone technology

Boeing Co. is preparing to bolster the long-term safety of its troubled 737 Max with technology borrowed from space vehicles and urban drones that can provide data to help back up its sensors.

The system — known as synthetic air data — takes existing information on the aircraft, runs it through a computer program and produces readings that mimic what costly additional sensors provide.

Added as a result of pressure from overseas regulators, it would reduce the risk of accidents such as those on the Max. But it would also address a wide range of deadly air crashes triggered by confusing cockpit readings, according to engineers and academic research. It’s already proved its value on Boeing’s 787, and Airbus SE is adopting similar techniques in its aircraft.

“The reason why myself and a bunch of others are looking at it is it does have the promise to enhance safety,” said

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Boeing Boosts 737 Max Safety With Spacecraft, Drone Technology

(Bloomberg) — Boeing Co. is preparing to bolster the long-term safety of its troubled 737 Max with technology borrowed from space vehicles and urban drones that can provide data to help back up its sensors.

The system — known as synthetic air data — takes existing information on the aircraft, runs it through a computer program and produces readings that mimic what costly additional sensors provide.



a group of people in a store: Boeing Co. Holds 737 Max Software And Training Update Briefing


© Bloomberg
Boeing Co. Holds 737 Max Software And Training Update Briefing

A Boeing Co. 737 Max airplane at the company’s manufacturing facility in Renton, Washington.

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Photographer: David Ryder/Bloomberg

Added as a result of pressure from overseas regulators, it would reduce the risk of accidents such as those on the Max. But it would also address a wide range of deadly air crashes triggered by confusing cockpit readings, according to engineers and academic research. It’s already proved its value on Boeing’s 787,

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Ocean Technologies Group Appoints Experienced Technology Leader as CFO

By


The Maritime Executive


08-20-2020 01:44:04

Experienced technology executive Maarten Van Gool has joined Ocean Technologies Group, as Chief Financial Officer.

Maarten’s diverse experience in technology businesses spans three decades with blue-chip organizations building strong fiduciary controls and successful businesses and teams. He started his career with global technology giant HP in the Netherlands during the early 1990s and thereafter moved to Palo Alto to join Agilent Technologies as part of the core team who spun off Agilent from HP and took the company public. During Maarten’s time as Global Financial Control Director and then Global Compliance Director for Agilent Technologies, he led the creation of a global compliance shared services center based in India. He has since held leadership roles with Tom Tom, AVG (acquired by Avast software) and was most recently was CFO and then CEO for Lobster Ink, a leading online learning provider to the global hospitality

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The Ocean’s Microplastics Mess: Technology & Technique

The science and technology surrounding discovery, mitigation and clean-up of microplastics in the world’s environment makes this year’s “MTR100.” Here we offer insights on the organizations, people and technologies taking the lead.

As marine journalists, scientists, technologists, activists and enthusiasts, we are aware of the large-scale impact that consumer macro-plastic products have on aquatic ecosystems. Ranging from plastic bags and straws to bottles and fishing nets, these materials pollute harbors, rivers, lakes and oceans, all while threatening the prosperity of wildlife, natural habitats and human health. To make matters worse, the chemical structure of most plastic materials prevents its complete degradation in nature, instead leaving behind microplastic particles. Measured as smaller than five millimeters in size, microplastics can be difficult to see with the naked eye and even harder to collect and identify. Microplastics are not new to the marine industry; the presence of such tiny particles in our oceans

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How Robotic Technology Officially Identified the World War II Submarine S-28 Gravesite

Discovered by the Lost 52 Expedition Team

After almost 75 years utilizing advanced imaging technology, Ocean Explorer Tim Taylor and his Lost 52 Expedition Team officially discovered the final resting place for the 49 Sailors of the U.S. submarine S-28 (SS-133) off Oahu, Hawaii. The U.S. Navy recently validated the identity of the wreck, which Taylor located in 2017.

The 4 July 2019 marks the 75th anniversary of the submarine loss, which was conducting exercises at the time she disappeared. “The discovery of the USS S-28 as part of my ‘Lost 52 Project’ continues to honour the men, their mission and their memory. It is important that they not be forgotten and that future generations recognize their invaluable sacrifice for our country and the world”, said Taylor.

“Identification of a Navy gravesite is something Naval History and Heritage Command’s Underwater Archaeology Branch takes great care in doing,” said Sam

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Technology – BBC News

Robot fruit pickers could help solve the industry’s skilled recruitment crisis, says a Kent farm manager.

Giles Cannon, who manages Roughway Farm near Tonbridge, says his farm has been “overwhelmed” with job interest in recent weeks as hundreds of people seek to work as fruit pickers.

It comes several weeks after a national call was made by the Environment Secretary, George Eustice, urging students and furloughed workers to apply for seasonal farm work amid feared shortages.

However, hiring experienced staff has proved challenging for the agricultural sector, according to Mr Cannon.

Mr Cannon, who has worked in the farming sector for decades, said: “To call fruit picking an unskilled job is doing the industry a disservice.”

Farmers around the world are increasingly interested in robot technology to address the long-term decline in skilled labour, according to 2019 research carried out by Fieldwork Robotics, a company linked to the University of

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